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Clinical Skills for Medical Students

4.0
6 reviews
Enrolled: 36 students
Duration: 10 hours
Lectures: 4
Video: 9 hours
Level: Advanced

Archive

Working hours

Monday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Tuesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Friday 9:30 am - 5.00 pm
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed

Archive

Working hours

Monday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Tuesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Wednesday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Thursday 9:30 am - 6.00 pm
Friday 9:30 am - 5.00 pm
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Clinical Skill

Clinical Skills for Medical Students

The main purpose of the early introduction of Clinical Skills Learning (CSL) to pre-clinical years is to allow medical students to gain experience in clinical examination skills, basic medical procedures, history-taking and clinical communication.

To learn any skill, three components are important – Knowledge of how to do the skill, repeated practice and feedback and evaluation. You may obtain Knowledge of how to do a skill from many sources – text books, being shown by someone, course guides, medical journals, videos, the internet. Bear in mind that there may be (and usually is) more than one “right” way of doing a skill and you will need to judge different methods and decide which you think is best for your style of practice.

The Clinical Skills Course spans the first eighteen months of school for all medical students. Students begin to develop and refine their clinical skills, the essential elements of “doctoring” that physicians use during patient encounters. In Clinical Skills (CS), students learn to communicate with patients, families, and other members of the care team; examine patients; develop clinical reasoning skills; and understand the important role of a student-doctor in a patient’s care.

You need to practice a great deal to become fluent and competent at a skill. Research suggests that about 10,000 hours of practice is required to become expert. You may practice in simulation on models, on each other, on relatives, on patients (with appropriate consent). You may wish to practice initially in a safe environment, such as the clinical skills center, and then when you have gained some confidence start practicing in more realistic environments. In general, the more realistic your practice, then the more likely the skills that you learn are to transfer to real life situations.

Feedback and evaluation is essential, to make sure that you are learning the skills right. It is difficult for you to see what you are doing when you are doing it, and asking a peer or a tutor to watch and give feedback is important,
otherwise you run a very significant risk of becoming very slick at performing a skill badly

Starting Course

1
Nvidia New Technologies Slides
2
Quiz: Mobile / Native Apps
48 questions

After Intro

1
Realistic Graphic on UE4
2
Volta GPU for optimization.
3
Deep Learning
4.0
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